Smart Meter Laws in Michigan

We found it very effective to ask David Sheldon of Michigan Stop Smart Meters to give a 20-minute to one-hour presentation at your board. At each presentation he and DTE have appeared at, the Council has adopted a resolution against smart meters. If you want him to come and speak to your board, contact him or us. To put it on the agenda, call your city manager`s office and ask them to put smart meters on the agenda (for a future meeting) and tell them you want David Sheldon to come and talk for 15 minutes (or more). David can make a PowerPoint presentation if the board has a projector. Contact us and/or David Sheldon at fdshel@gmx.com. Be sure to include “Let`s speak at the Council meeting” in the subject line of your email. Since the blackout in the northeast in 2003 revealed shortcomings in the power grid system, there has been pressure for a “smart grid.” Part of it starts with homes and businesses. A better understanding of when and how electricity is consumed is important for utilities. It`s also important for customers who can use this data to communicate with smart devices and bring in external analysts to help homes and businesses become more energy efficient.

Thus, spending taxpayers` money to create a “smart grid” seemed to help everyone. Many of the communities that passed smart meter resolutions did so before anyone understood anything about dirty electricity and before the Michigan Public Service Commission approved DTE and consumer withdrawal programs. As a result, many of the following resolutions do not contain all the language they would have if they were adopted today. Nevertheless, they are a sign of government disapproval of how public services treat their customers and the health and privacy of their customers. This is a good deal for energy companies because: 1) utilities receive tax money to get better data to understand electricity consumption, and 2) they don`t have to pay workers to get to every house to read the meter. Why resolutions matter It is very important to get local government agencies to pass resolutions, and those who have worked in the Legislative Assembly, as well as several lawyers, have told us that getting more is essential for our cause. City and county government resolutions give us a lot of influence on the passage of laws because they show that local government agencies are concerned about smart meters. In addition, they can and have been used in legal proceedings, including in ongoing appeals against the DTE exemption. People to help you We can refer you to two people who can help you get a resolution passed by your local government.

Both have a high success rate in this endeavor. One in particular started out like most of us – he knew nothing about smart meters. He walked on the record and was very successful. He can coach you as you can yourself. We can let people in your community know so they can support you. Contact us for more information. It is very important to get local government authorities to make decisions about smart meters. Legislators and lawyers have told us that getting more is essential to our cause.

City and county government resolutions give us a lot of influence on the passage of laws because they show that local government agencies are concerned about smart meters. Legislators are paying attention. After all, these citizens elect them in and out of the office. Decisions are also important because they can and have been used in court proceedings. Council and Commission meetings are usually broadcast by cable, so your discussion of smart meters will enlighten many people. Utility customers who choose not to use a smart meter will have to pay a monthly surcharge in Michigan. Photo| Roger Mastroianni Vermont is the first state to adopt a statewide free opt-out for smart meters. Most in California and Arizona have analog meter removal options for utilities that use smart meters. The group of retail clients who filed the lawsuit asked the court to reconsider its decision, but was again dismissed by the court on July 6.

There are no further calls, said MPSC spokesman Matt Helms. The Residential Customer Group raised privacy and security concerns about smart meters, but the Court of Appeal said the arguments were unfounded. The federal government plans to give electric utilities an additional $3 billion to install more smart meters, including in Michigan. It is part of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. There has been a dispute over the sentence since it began in 2013, although this lawsuit began in 2018. Helms said three of Michigan`s regulated utilities use smart meters as a more efficient and accurate way to measure energy use: Consumer, DTE and Upper Peninsula Power Co. More than a decade ago, the federal government gave 77 energy companies a billion taxpayer dollars to buy and install smart meters. This was part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

“The surcharges cover the costs of maintaining and supporting a utility`s analog meters,” Helms said in an email. “The monthly surcharges cover the cost of manual meter reading, which would otherwise be covered by smart meters.” Vermont is the first state to adopt a statewide free opt-out for smart meters. Mission:data has published a report describing how electric utilities have disabled the data exchange capabilities of millions of smart meters. Households that choose not to use a smart meter to measure their energy use will still have to pay a monthly rejection fee because the Michigan Supreme Court refused to hear a case about it.